Dance Field Scenarios Overview

How do I use these Dance Field Scenarios?

    • All Standard Recommendations apply.
    • Note that the Standard Recommendations are not official state guidance at this time, but are adapted directly from state guidance.
    • Consider these documents an addendum to the Standard Recommendations, created for specific dance audiences.
      • These Dance Field Scenarios are meant to provide additional ideas and suggestions based on dance field questions, collaborative information sharing, and public resources as referenced in the Acknowledgements.
      • The ideas and suggestions presented herein are merely recommendations and are not official state guidance.
      • These Dance Field Scenarios are intentionally organized around the three distinct categories  (people, places, and processes) used within state guidance to date to offer consistency and easy integration.
      • If relevant, please use this Dance Field Scenario within your tailored reopening plans, as tailored and nuanced for your needs, business model, and space(s). 
      • If you are a “Responsible Party,” See Section: “Operator / Employer Plans” for a recommended step-by-step process.
    • Disclaimer:
  • Ongoing updates and official state guidance should always take precedence over what is presented in the Standard Recommendations and Dance Field Scenarios.

What do we mean by “Responsible Parties”?

“Responsible Parties” is a term used by New York State in all provided reopening guidance. Responsible Parties are “the owner/operator of the institution or another party as may be designated by the owner/operator of the institution.” The Responsible Parties are accountable for adhering to all local, state, and federal requirements. The Responsible Parties are also accountable for staying current with any updates to these requirements, as well as incorporating the same into any operations and/or Site Safety Plan. State guidance expects your cooperation with the protocols and plans put in place by those Responsible Parties.

For dance company managers, please note that you may not be considered the Responsible Party in all scenarios. For instance, if your dance company has and regularly uses its own space, you are the Responsible Party. However, if your dance company regularly rehearses and performs in indoor or outdoor spaces that you do not run, the Responsible Party is the owner/operator of those various spaces. As a visiting dance company, state guidance expects your cooperation with the protocols and plans put in place by those Responsible Parties.

For independent dance workers, please note that—unless you own your own dance company or organization or run a studio, theater, or performing arts center—you are not likely considered a Responsible Party. The Responsible Party would be your employer and/or the operator(s) of the space(s) in which your dance activity takes place. 

For dance teachers, please note that—unless you own your own dance company or organization or run a studio, theater, or performing arts center—you are not likely considered a Responsible Party. The Responsible Party would be your employer and/or the operator(s) of the space(s) in which your dance activity takes place. 

For office-based dance workers, please note that—unless you own your own dance company or organization or run a studio, theater, or performing arts center—you are not likely considered a Responsible Party. The Responsible Party would be your employer and/or the operator(s) of the space(s) in which your dance activity takes place. 

Dance studio managers are considered a Responsible Party. They are expected to put a reopening plan in place per state guidance and to ensure clarity, transparency, and confidence among all artists, staff, and patrons.

Dance presenters/performance venues are considered a Responsible Party. They are expected to put a reopening plan in place per state guidance and to ensure clarity, transparency, and confidence among all artists, staff, and patrons.

For dance studio visitors/renters, please note that—unless you run the dance studio you are visiting/renting—you are not considered the Responsible Party in this instance. Responsible Parties are “the owner/operator of the institution or another party as may be designated by the owner/operator of the institution.”

For performance venue visitors/renters, please note that—unless you run the performance venue you are visiting/renting—you are not considered the Responsible Party in this instance.

If you are not comfortable with a Responsible Party’s safety measures or lack thereof, consider discussing this with the Responsible Party, reconsidering your engagement, establishing increased safety measures for your dance company, and/or filing a general or zone-based report.

How do I stay in the know?

What do we mean by “Dance Company Managers”?

In this context, “Dance Company Managers” refers to formal and informal dance company leadership and management such as Artistic Directors, Executive Directors, CEOs, Founders, Leadership Teams, Company Directors, Company Managers, etc. “Dance companies” includes the full spectrum from soloist companies to multiple member companies, working indoors and/or outdoors.

Please note that independent dance workers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers, dance presenters, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those dance company managers whose roles have crossover.

EXAMPLES: 

Kyle Abraham and Sydnie Liggett of A.I.M; Ayodele Casel; Gina Gibney, Nigel Campbell, Amy Miller, and Trina Mannino of Gibney Company; Virginia Johnson and Anna Glass of Dance Theatre of Harlem Company; Remi Harris; Alice Sheppard of Kinetic Light; Sydnie L. Mosley, A. Nia Austin-Edwards, and Allegra Romita of SLMDances; Doug Varone of Doug Varone and Dancers; etc.

What do we mean by “Independent Dance Workers”?

In this context, “Independent Dance Workers” refers to dancers of all kinds (freelance, salaried, union, non-union), choreographers, performers, guest artists, and other independent contractors. It further includes soloist dancers and dance workers as well as those who participate in multiple-member dance companies or groups, working indoors and/or outdoors.

Please note that dance company managers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers, dance presenters, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those independent dance workers whose roles have crossover.

EXAMPLES: 

Ephrat Asherie of Ephrat Asherie Dance and Dorrance Dance; Nigel Campbell (and other dancers) of Gibney Company; Ayodele Casel; Daniel Charon (and other guest performers) of Doug Varone and Dancers; Tamisha Guy (and other dancers) of A.I.M; Remi Harris; Michael Maag (and other dancers) of Kinetic Light; Sarah F. Parker (Actors Equity and SAG union member) of Jesus Christ Superstar and Camille A. Brown and Dancers; Ingrid Silva (and other dancers) of Dance Theatre of Harlem Company; Ebonie Smith (and other collaborators) of SLMDances; etc.

What do we mean by “Dance Teachers”?

In this context, “Dance Teachers” refers to dance instructors, choreographers, guest teachers, etc. It further includes dance teachers on faculty as well as freelance teachers and independent contractors teaching across multiple locations, working indoors, outdoors, and/or remotely. These recommendations may also be helpful to those office-based dance workers who work directly with dance teachers, in-school programs, and other teacher-based dance activities.

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers, dance presenters, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those dance teachers whose roles have crossover.

What do we mean by “Office-Based Dance Workers”?

In this context, “Office-Based Dance Workers” refers to the staff and administrators of studios, theaters, performing arts centers, and nonprofit arts organizations who typically work in an office and/or on-site and are engaged in any capacity (full-time, part-time, permanent, temporary, seasonal, and as-needed). It further includes those who must return to indoor on-site work, given the nature of their job, and those who can continue working remotely.

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, dance teachers, dance studio managers, dance presenters, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those office-based dance workers whose roles have crossover.

EXAMPLES:

Anjali Amin, Associate Director of Marketing Strategy at The Joyce Theater (remote); Donald Borror, Executive Director at Dorrance Dance (remote); Tramaine Chelan’gat, Programs Manager at Kinetic Light (remote); Elyse Desmond, Director of Facilities & Security at Gibney (on-site); Alaric E. Hahn, Director of Studio & Theater Operations at Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater (on-site); Darrell Jordan, Maintenance at Mark Morris Dance Center (on-site); Mykel Marai Nairne, Development Fellow at Pentacle (remote); Nora Perez, Finance Associate at Ballet Hispanico (remote); Pavan Thimmaiah, Founder & Director at PMT House of Dance (on-site); Gregory Youdan, Research & Advocacy Coordinator at Dance/NYC (remote); etc.

What do we mean by “Dance Studio Managers”?

In this context, “Dance Studio Managers” refers to dance studio leadership and management, including directors, facilities teams, rentals teams, crew, and other relevant teams working in any capacity (full-time, part-time, permanent, temporary, seasonal, and as-needed) to host dance classes, rehearsals, and other dance studio activities indoors and/or outdoors. 

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance presenters, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those dance studio managers whose roles have crossover.

EXAMPLES: 

Eliot Feld (President), Maggie Christ (Director of Operations), Jason Walters (Building Manager) at Ballet Tech; Jonathan Hollander (Artistic Director) and Emad M. Salem (COO) at Battery Dance; Diane King (Executive Director), Allison Ellner (Owner), Kwabena Edwards (Director of Studio Operations), Tracey George (Front Desk Staff), Beverly Huang (Retail Operations Manager) at Broadway Dance Center;  Carlota Santana (Artistic Director), Hanaah Bates (Executive Director), Tariro Chinyanganya (Studio Manager) at Flamenco Vivo Studios; Gina Gibney (CEO), Elyse Desmond (Director of Center Facilities & Security), and Mariana Kao (Director of Center Rentals) at Gibney; Mark Morris (Artistic Director), Nancy Umanoff (Executive Director), Mark Sacks (Director of Facilities & Capital Projects), Arturo Velasquez (Maintenance Mechanic/Overnight Supervisor) at Mark Morris Dance Center; Barbara Bryan (Executive Director), Kristel Faye Baldoz (Operations Manager), Christopher Unpezverde Núñez (Accessibility Consultant) at Movement Research; Pavan Thimmaiah (Director) at PMT House of Dance; Patricia Ripley (CEO), Butch Grier (Chief of Staff), Jorge Rojas (Studios Manager), Shayne Grier (Studios Manager), Venus Suarez (Studios Manager) and more at Ripley-Grier Studios; etc.

What do we mean by “Dance Presenters/Performance Venues”?

In this context, “Dance Presenters/Performance Venues” refers to the leadership and management of any type of dance presenters, such as studios, theaters, performing arts centers, festivals, and any other presenters (indoors or outdoors). It includes the directors, facilities teams, rentals teams, festivals teams, production teams, crew, and other relevant teams working in any capacity (full-time, part-time, permanent, temporary, seasonal, and as-needed) to present dance indoors and/or outdoors. 

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers, dance studio visitors/renters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those dance presenters whose roles have crossover.

EXAMPLES: 

Jonathan Hollander (Artistic Director) and Emad M. Salem (COO), Barry Steele (Production Director), Andriana Matviyishyn (Festival Lead) and more at Battery Dance / Battery Dance Festival; Arthur Aviles (Artistic Director), Charles Rice-Gonzalez  (Executive Director) and more at The Bronx Academy of Arts & Dance; Anita Durst (Artistic Director) and more at Chashama; Gina Gibney (CEO), Elyse Desmod (Director of Center Facilities & Security), Mariana Kao (Director of Center Rentals), Sarah A.O. Rosner (Performance & Residencies Producer), Asami Morita (Director of Production & Resident Lighting Designer), Preston Miller (Digital Media Consultant) and more at Gibney; Linda Shelton (Executive Director), Jeff Segal (Director of Production), Kyle Hagen (Lighting Board Operator), Julie Ana Dobo (Head Electrician) and more at The Joyce Theater; Barbara Bryan (Executive Director), Kristel Faye Baldoz (Operations Manager), Christopher Unpezverde Núñez (Accessibility Consultant) and more at Movement Research; Russell Granet (CEO), Lisa Lawer Post (COO), Melinda Berk (Director of Theater Operations), Lilaia Kairis (Director of Digital Services), Caitlin Alaimo (Front of House Manager) and more at New 42 / The New Victory Theater; Arlene Shuler (CEO), Julie Mason Groob (COO), Jay Dority (Director of Facilities), Emily Hare (Front of House) and more at New York City Center; Bill T. Jones (Artistic Director), Kim Cullen (Executive Director), Janet Wong (Associate Artistic Director), Hillery Makatura (Director of Production), Gregory English (Operations Manager) and more at New York Live Arts; etc.

What do we mean by “Dance Studio Visitors/Renters”?

In this context, “Dance Studio Visitors/Renters” refers to the public at large: any studio renter; any audience member or guest; and any independent groups or individuals using a dance studio for dance activities, events, gatherings, or other activities.

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers dance presenters and performance venue visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those dance studio visitors/renters who consider themselves to be one of these constituent groups. 

What do we mean by “Performance Venue Visitors/Renters”?

In this context, “Performance Venue Visitors/Renters” refers to the public at large: any theater renter; any presented artist(s) or companies; any audience member or guest; and any independent groups or individuals using a performance venue for dance activities, events, gatherings, or other activities.

Please note that dance company managers, independent dance workers, dance teachers, office-based dance workers, dance studio managers, dance presenters and dance studio visitors/renters are also provided Dance Field Scenarios with recommendations, which may be relevant for those performance venue visitors/renters who consider themselves to be one of these constituent groups. 

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